CWC Activities

ACCCC fulfills its mission by improving access, reducing cancer disparities, advocating for public policy, and implementing the Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan, which addresses prevention, early detection, survivorship and palliative care, and access to care.

Prevention

Although the risk for cancer increases with age, healthy choices can reduce the risk of getting cancer. Risk factors for cancer include use of tobacco, exposure to radon, poor nutition, lack of physical activity, being overwieght or obese, exposure to sunlight or indoor tanning, and exposure to viruses such as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Hepatitis B (HBV). The American Cancer Society estimates that cancers that are controllable through prevention an early detection will account for half of all new cancer cases diagnosed.

Primary prevention of cancer should promote changes in policy, systems, and the environment that encourage Alabamians to make healthy lifestyle choices – to quit using tobacco, eat better, get more physical exercise, and avoid overexposure to ultraviolet light.

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Early Detection

Finding cancer in its early stages, before signs or symptoms are present, leads to improved outcomes for almost all types of cancer. Early detection of cancer enables treatment to be started at the earliest stage possible, significantly improving survival. Detection of cancer in an early, asymptomatic stage greatly improves available treatment options for many cancers.

Finding cancer in its early stages, before signs or symptoms are present, leads to improved outcomes for almost all types of cancer. Early detection of cancer enables treatment to be started at the earliest stage possible, significantly improving survival. Detection of cancer in an early, asymptomatic stage greatly improves available treatment options for many cancers.

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Survivorship and Palliative Care

Tertiary prevention begins after diagnosis and continues during the treatment of cancer. The goal of cancer treatment is to cure cancer, control the disease, or reduce symptoms of the disease. Treatment plans vary from one patient to another; plans are dependent on the type of cancer, as well as the stage of the disease (severity of cancer, and whether it has spread). Physicians may also consider a patient’s age and general health. Treatment plans may change over time. A patient’s cancer may be responsive to one treatment or a combination of treatments.

Tertiary prevention should promote changes in policy, systems, and the environment by ensuring that all patients receive treatment best suited for them in proximity to where they work and live, are educated about all of their treatment options, have an advanced directive so that their wishes for treatment are known, and have access to end-of-life care when treatment no longer works or is no longer wanted by the patient.

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Access to Care

Patient navigators help patients improve their access to and understanding of their health care. The importance of patient navigation is increasingly emphasized as a strategy to overcome the barriers patients encounter in obtaining timely and quality medical care; which includes access to screening. While patient navigation can be helpful to any individual screened for or diagnosed with cancer, it is a particularly important tool in decreasing health disparities in groups that have difficulty accessing healthcare services or limited knowledge of the healthcare system.

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CWC activities will be updated regularly.





Page last updated: September 17, 2020